DT/OL April Regas, Colorado Freeze, Women's Football Alliance

WFA Spotlight: April Regas, DT/OL, Colorado Freeze

Name: April Regas
Nickname: Floyd
Position: DT/OL
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Height : 5’4’’
Weight: 180lb
Age: 23
Birthday: April 20th
Birthplace: Denver, CO
College: University of Colorado – Denver: Bachelor’s of Science/ Colorado State University : Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Football Experience: This is my second season playing football
High School: Thomas Jefferson High School
Other Occupation: Veterinary technician for six years. I am now in vet school, scheduled to graduate in 2021.
Favorite Sports Teams: Denver Broncos
Hobbies: Concerts, dancing, breweries, hiking.
Passions: Travelling, veterinary medicine, public health, wildlife conservation, dancing, football
College Sports: Club volleyball
Other Sports played: Volleyball, swimming
How/why you got into football: I have always wanted to play football. However, growing up I did not know it was an option for women until I found the Colorado Freeze. Since discovering women’s football, I have never looked back.
Family: I grew up as a single child, with my mom raising me as a single parent.

TWO TRUTHS & A LIE: 
— I have lived in 8 different states.
— I have worked with animals in Serengeti National Park.
— I dove with sharks in Honduras.

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IN HER OWN WORDS:
My name is April Regas. I currently play defensive tackle for the Colorado Freeze, as well as offensive line. I got involved with women’s football last year and never looked back.

I was fortunate enough to join a team that worked their way to winning the Founder’s Bowl with the IWFL, as well as being awarded the lineman of the year award, my first season was one of excitement and passion! I am hopeful that this season will continue to bring new growth and development, after having gotten past the first-year jitters and joining the WFA.

Football is by far one of the best decisions I have ever made and has continued to change my life for the better. I enrolled in veterinary school at Colorado State University and  people are often amazed that I juggle the rigorous veterinary curriculum, 3+ practices per week, and games on the weekends — many of which require travel to various states.

But I could not see myself doing anything differently. Being on that field, fully immersed in those 10 seconds, and the technique of each individual play has a way of making you forget the things outside. It is the most amazing outlet.

Growing up, I always wanted to play. I remember consistently telling my friends and family that I wish girls played football. People often joked and called me “linebacker” in middle school because my thighs and calves were so big. They always said I was built to play football. And with a childhood packed full of adversity, I could have used an outlet for aggression. My home life was full of drugs, abuse, and neglect. During my teenage years, I spent many days suspended from school for fighting. Having an outlet in a controlled and team-oriented environment such as football would’ve made a world of difference. Luckily, I found football anyway!

If I haven’t said it enough, football has changed my life. I have never experienced such a close-knit community composed of so many different individuals. It really is inspirational to see the fire, strength, and beauty of all the women in this league striving to do things people often say they cannot, in addition to the supportive men and fans who continually support such a powerful movement. I am honored to play football and hope to continue doing so as long as my body is able. In terms of my outlook on the future, I hope to see football being made more and more accessible to younger females. Starting an athlete’s training as young as a toddler allows for much more growth and knowledge of the game. I am excited to see what the future of women’s football brings and hope I can continue to be a part of it.